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AUICK Action Plan Progress Report, 2010

The Context and Influence of the Asian Urban Information Center of Kobe


3.3. Second 2005 Workshop on Universalization of Primary Education for the Poor

Second 2005 Workshop

Second 2005 Workshop Action Plan Progress Reports


Second 2005 Workshop

Achieving universal primary education by 2015 is the second of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The Second 2005 Workshop, from 13 to 23 November 2005, incorporated presentations by Kobe Education Department and City Officials on the “Administration Mechanism of Japan and Outline of Kobe City”, “Education Policy and Economic Efficiency”, the “System of Elementary Education in Kobe and Japan”, and “Educational Financial Aid System in Kobe City”. Workshop participants held discussion sessions on the role of local government in primary education and visited Kobe’s elementary schools in rural and urban districts. The UNFPA Representative of Mongolia also participated in the workshop, presenting on the goals and activities of UNFPA in terms of universalizing primary education.

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Second 2005 Workshop Action Plan Progress Reports

Chittagong 

A plan for Chittagong proposed school attendance studies to encourage parents, the media, social and religious groups and NGO collaboration for increased attendance, and teacher training and peer-counseling for street children. The participant’s transferal though, impeded the plan’s implementation.
Plan status: non implementation 

Weihai 

Weihai’s Action Plan advocated for new schools and increased training and facilities in rural and urban areas. It led to the building of four new schools (two primary, one middle and one combined), reducing class sizes in the municipality, and increased access through allocation of 473 school buses. Also under the plan, teachers under the age of 45 were re-trained, 225 qualified teachers were sent for training in Singapore, and 876 primary and middle school teachers received Internet training. Free compulsory education began in Autumn 2006 for rural, and Autumn 2007 for urban students, and incidental and textbook costs were covered from Spring, 2008.
Plan status: full implementation 

Chennai 

The Chennai plan aimed to increase primary school enrollment and completion by improving standards of decentralized education through community participation. Here too, the transferal of the workshop participant prevented the plan’s implementation.
Plan status: non implementation 

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Surabaya 

The plan for Surabaya aimed to increase primary school attendance (with special focus on slum-dwellers) through free schooling to children of low-income families, increased teaching staff and training, and curriculum and facility improvement, through an education budget proposal for funding. Again, the participant’s transferal prevented implementation.
Plan status: non implementation 

Kuantan 

To maximize educational resources and their availability to all children in Kuantan, the Action Plan for the Municipality proposed to synchronize educational institutions, community heads and NGOs, to ensure support to the poor for primary education enrollment. A committee gathered relevant data and implemented the plan, ensuring poor families’ receipt of aid. The District Education Department approved the plan’s successful implementation.
Plan status: full implementation 

Faisalabad 

With Faisalabad’s low primary education level, the Action Plan collected data on enrollment and dropouts, arranged funding for the poor, and improved infrastructure and teacher-training. Financial support for materials came from the Zakat Fund, a Saudi Arabian development assistance funding organization. One third of the city’s schools received additional infrastructure and educational facilities, additional teacher training and counseling was arranged, and a new government policy provided free textbooks and tuition to all students. Enrollment increased by 9-10% per year in the two years after the plan’s implementation.
Plan status: full implementation 

Olongapo 

High dropout rates in Olongapo led to an Action Plan to improve education, schools and infrastructure. The plan advocated for increased scholarships under a new Master Plan for Universalization of Education for Urban Poor. As a result, the Mayor raised education to the second highest priority of the city’s 10-point agenda, reflected in additional legislation and ordinances. Scholarships were provided to 3,187 students in 2005-’06, 3,962 in 2006-7, 1,927 in 2007-8, and 2,882 in 2008-9. The plan led to the Special Program for Employment of Students (SPES), and arranged volunteer student counseling, and meetings among representatives of 60 urban poor communities. Expanded funding, policy formulation and education of urban poor parents are now considered.
Plan status: full implementation 

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Khon Kaen 

The economic downturn of 1997 left many people in Khon Kaen poor and out of work, and children lacking education. The Action Plan arranged vocational training in municipal schools in slum communities, and free education and financial support until employment age. An Assistance Center was set up to educate underprivileged poor children aged 2 to 6, through story-telling, painting, songs, plasticine modelling and Thai and English Alphabet training. Children in Municipal schools were provided with stationary, shoes, bags, books and uniforms. All schools in Khon Kaen Municipality provided free education to the underprivileged, and homeless children received vocational training in hairdressing, vegetable growing, fisheries and baking. An out-of-school education centre was also established, and volunteer teachers educated and monitored poor, homeless and disabled children.
Plan status: full implementation 

Danang 

Increased migration and rapid urbanization left many children out of education by 2005. The Action Plan set out to increase enrollment in kindergartens, provide migrant worker training and their children’s education, and financial assistance for the poor. Public information on child health was increased, and schools coordinated with parents and the district government to prevent dropouts. As a result, each school now conducts parent-teacher meetings, health checks and annual immigrant student and enrollment surveys. Teacher screening and training and evaluation meetings improve education, equipment and textbooks. The local government has incorporated primary education universalization into the local socio-economic development plan, leading to increased orders and budget allocation and scholarship schemes to help poor families.
Plan status: full implementation

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CONTENTS

AUICK Action Plan Progress Report, 2010

Introduction

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 3.1.

Chapter 3.2.

Chapter 3.3.

Chapter 3.4.

Chapter 3.5.

Chapter 3.6.

Chapter 3.7.

Chapter 3.8.

Chapter 3.9.

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Conclusion

Annex

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